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Author Topic: Off-grid Smartphone  (Read 299 times)

No One

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Off-grid Smartphone
« on: December 13, 2017, 05:34:30 PM »

I know you can have old school Nokia dumb phones and ditch SIM cards.

But in case I do need to do online stuff from my mobile phone, is there a secure one?

I hear Androids have many flaws that could be exploited. Besides the big google brother sees it all. I don’t think Apple is way better.

Are there alternatives?
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hidden0

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Re: Off-grid Smartphone
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2018, 02:19:40 PM »

There is no such a thing as off-grid smartphone. If it's online, it is on-grid. On top of that, there is no smartphone 100% secure. Nothing is 100% secure. Finally, the more security you have, the less practicability you have.

That being said, you should worry more about using VPN, trustable internet connections, trustable apps (and be minimalist regarding apps), strong passwords, two-step authentication, etc, than the model of your smartphone.

There is no consensus about the best model. It all depends on what you need it for, what functionalities you need, and your situation overall.

PS: I prefer iPhones over Androids, just because I hear less privacy and security issues with Apple than Google. But I absolutely don't asume I'm totaly secure with them either.
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No One

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Re: Off-grid Smartphone
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 03:45:37 AM »

Purism phone is coming  :)
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J S

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Re: Off-grid Smartphone
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2018, 06:40:13 PM »

There is no such a thing as off-grid smartphone. If it's online, it is on-grid. On top of that, there is no smartphone 100% secure. Nothing is 100% secure. Finally, the more security you have, the less practicability you have.

That being said, you should worry more about using VPN, trustable internet connections, trustable apps (and be minimalist regarding apps), strong passwords, two-step authentication, etc, than the model of your smartphone.

There is no consensus about the best model. It all depends on what you need it for, what functionalities you need, and your situation overall.

PS: I prefer iPhones over Androids, just because I hear less privacy and security issues with Apple than Google. But I absolutely don't asume I'm totaly secure with them either.

I would strongly argue against iOS. If you're looking for usability, I could understand. But if you're serious about privacy, you should check this guide from https://airvpn.org/topic/15527-how-to-improve-cell-mobile-phone-security/?p=32831

I will just post a sample:

"The key difference between Android and other operating systems is that Android is, mostly, an Open Source (FOSS) system, which allows the operating system to be audited independently to verify if it properly protects users' information and communication. It also facilitates development of security applications for this platform. Many security-aware programmers develop Android applications with user safety and security in mind.

Based on the fact that Blackberry runs proprietary code (ditto for the iPhone) - they can't be trusted due to no independent verification of the code. Blackberry phones have been presented as “secure” messaging and email devices. This is because messages and emails are securely channeled through Blackberry servers, out of the reach of potential eavesdroppers. Unfortunately, more and more governments are demanding access to these communications, citing need for guarding against potential terrorism and organised crime. India, United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia and Lebanon are examples of governments which have scrutinized the use of Blackberry devices and demanded access to user data in their countries. Also, encrypted messaging and other apps available on Blackberry platforms fail the EFF security test.

Therefore, an Android phone may be the best option if you must own a mobile - running a version of GNU/Linux and allowing for the phone to be 'rooted' (the setting of root administration level access). With root access, you can remove bloatware that came on your phone, use an app permissions manager, run a firewall, enabling tethering even if your carrier is blocking it, manually back up your installed app settings, and use a variety of other tweaks that require low-level system access."


With a rooted android, you can limit your outgoing connections, you can firewall it, you can packet inspect it, you can build a mobile router out of it. Never heard of any iOS capable of such.
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